8 Vision Myths Debunked

8 Vision Myths Debunked

We all grow up with myths that we once accepted as fact—until they’re debunked and we’re left wondering where the myths came from in the first place.

There are quite a few vision myths floating around that won’t seem to go away: here are 8 of the most pervasive.

A darker lens doesn’t always mean better protection. While darker lenses will help if your eyes are sensitive to bright light, the darker tint isn’t necessarily the best protective option against the sun’s harmful ultra violet rays.

The important thing to remember when buying sunglasses is to look for a label saying the lenses offer 100% protection from both UVA and UVB rays.

If you want to improve your vision, eating carrots isn’t going to bring your eyesight back to 20/20. However, carrots (and many other vegetables rich in Vitamin A) can contribute to good overall vision health, and are a good addition to any healthy diet. You won’t be able to throw away your eyeglasses simply by eating this vegetable. Carrots contain a lot of vitamin A, and there have been several studies recently showing that this vitamin – along with vitamins C and E – helps to reduce the impact of both cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

While you may feel a little dizzy, trying on someone else’s glasses won’t damage your eyes in the long run. For the most comfortable seeing experience, make sure your own prescription is up-to-date, and that you visit an eye doctor annually.

If you believe this myth, you’ve probably watched a movie about fighting sometime in your life. Unfortunately, there’s no proven benefit to pressing a steak up against a black eye. Although the cool temperature of the steak might help reduce swelling (a cold press will work even better), exposing your eyes to all that bacteria from raw meat could lead to a bad infection.

If you’ve ever stayed up late reading a favorite book in dim light, you’ll be relieved to learn that your affection for hard-to-put down mysteries had no effects other than pushing back your bed time. Although reading in dim light can cause eye fatigue, there’s no evidence that it leads to long term or permanent damage.

Wearing your eyeglasses won’t make your eyesight worse. Weakening eyesight is a natural progression that happens to many people as a consequence of aging as well as disease-related vision loss and other factors.

While vision naturally deteriorates for many people with age, you can help slow this process with a healthy diet, active lifestyle, wearing protective gear when necessary, and by seeing an eye doctor regularly.

If you don’t think there is anything wrong with your vision, then you may believe there is no need for an eye exam. However, eye exams are about more than correcting poor vision—they can help identify potential health problems. This can include serious systemic conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol and hypertension.

Whether or not you need corrective lenses, it’s still wise to see an eye doctor at least once every year.

Now That You’ve Seen The Light

We rely on our eyes for so much. Don’t let the nation’s vision fall prey to these 8 common myths—share with your friends so they, too, can see the light!

Provided by VSP Direct